Sunday, December 6, 2009

Insulin and Aging: How Paleo Works



Ai M showed the disparity between insulin changes between oral glucose loading (75 grams glucose) versus a high saturated fat CREAM dosing.


Carb equivalents 75 grams = 5 servings CARBs

Go to nutritiondata.com for more comparisons.

1 serv CARB = 15 grams

Dairy -- 1 cup milk = ~15 g

Fruit -- 2 bites is about 15 grams (small palm-full).

Grains (~ 15 grams):
Oatbran 1/3 cup. Oatmeal 1/3 cup. Bread 1 slice or half-slice depending on the density. Rice 1/3 cup. Pasta 1/3 cup. Broccoli 2-3 cups just kidding but infinitely more compared with grains which have an insanely high-carb density as well as genetic propensity to trigger stress, glucocorticoid and the expression of other 'bad' genes. See prior animal pharm FUNGENUT post HERE.

Legumes (~15 grams):
1/2 cup beans


Ai M et al. Clinica Chimica Acta 387 (2008) 36–41. Email me for the PDF if desired.

What is PALEO?
None of the above
--no dairy (except casein-free clarified butter/GHEE or whey protein)
--no grains (corn, oats, gluten (wheat/barley/rye), rice, etc)
--no legumes (beans, soybeans (unlesss soaked+fermented), peanuts)


Please see recent NephroPal post:
Insulin and Aging: How Paleo Works

Click above link...

46 comments:

Anonymous said...

You mean someone would have to eat all that to get the equivalent to 75g of glucose, right? Because 1 cup of milk has only 11.66g of carbs and half a cup of cooked beans has 23.58g, for instance.

Dr. B G said...

Sorry -- it's edited now.

One serving carbs is 15 grams.

For the OGTT, 75 grams is typically used and that is equivalent to 5 servings ( 5 x 15 grams).

Indeed. I used to consume that much at breakfast (high carb, low fat Nutri-grain 'breakfast' bar and cup of industrial low fat bGH n-6 milk) -- then have horrible panic attacks, rushed heart rate, irregular skipped heart beats at night, mild anxiety, stress intolerance, flushing and occ headaches.

Jim Purdy said...

"I used to consume that much at breakfast (high carb, low fat Nutri-grain 'breakfast' bar and cup of industrial low fat bGH n-6 milk) -- then have horrible panic attacks, rushed heart rate, irregular skipped heart beats at night, mild anxiety, stress intolerance, flushing and occ headaches."

Gosh, that all sounds so familiar to me. I used to make lots of urgent visits to emergency rooms, thinking I was having a heart attack. Once, when I thought I was going to die before I could get to an emergency room, I called 911.

All that doctors ever told me was to take more and more powerful medications and to have coronary artery stents. Considering that the meds caused more problems, and my first stent didn't help, I did some self-experimentation. When I switched from a high-card diet to a high-fat low-carb diet, all my symptoms disappeared.

For me, an apple a day ... sorry, I mean a high-fat avocado ... a day keeps the doctor away.

Dr. B G said...

Mr. Jim Purdy. You ROCK!!

Tim Terlegård said...

Do we know exactly how the fat results in less insulin?

Dr. B G said...

Hi Tim,

Insulin is very complicated (but not). It is a potently conserved hormone (and its analogues IGF which stands for insulin growth factor) across the animal kingdom.

Paleolithically, all food 'energy' was relatively scarce compared to modern times. Both seasonally and regionally. Both hunting and foraging were time consuming.

Our genes are locked into conserving all food 'energy' in all ways possible. We are actually programmed best for optimal function with fat metabolism. The heart and all muscles and organs. The brain as well. It functions optimally on its own 'source' of glucose, glutamine and ketone bodies.

Fats are already 'packaged and processed' for deliver and storage! No insulin required. Whereas carbs (starches, sweets) need to be 'repackaged' by the liver into TG (triglyerides, the transport form of fatty acids) for circulation out to where it is needed -- muscles, heart and organs.

Some glucose remains as glucose to be turned into glycogen for temporary muscle/organ storage. It will be turned to a fat later during different metabolic states (e.g. if not used).

Protein actually can trigger insulin. Eating a large meal (even if all veggie, little calories), the distention of the belly triggers insulin. Artificial sweeteners trigger BIG insulin jumps as well, which studies show lead to obesity and diabetes at the same rate as regularly-sweeted high fructose corn syrup sodas v. diet.

I hope that makes some sense!

Thanks for you comment.

G

Anonymous said...

Dr. B.G., this is unrelated and TMI, but I have noticed multiple times that slo-niacin (and maybe other vitamins/supplements?) pass through whole or undigested. For example where slo-niacin is supposed to slowly dissolve over 24 hrs, I pass it whole in the morning after taking it the previous night.
I am concerned that same thing might be happening with other supplements I take without conferring any benefits on me. Also wanted to mention that I take metformin and hence experience diarrhea often.

Dr. B G said...

Anonymous,

Studies show that the diarrhea and loose stools related to metformin use is attributed to a degradation in the 'good' flora in the gut by metformin. I am not sure why that occurs but it is likely that metformin is a synthetic drug/hormone-like molecule which may not agree with our receptors metabolic machinery in the intestinal tract (probably elsewhere too)?

Vitamin B12 deficiency is also highly associated with chronic long term use -- like other drugs like heartburn GERD drugs (Protonix, Pepcid, Prilosec/ Nexium, etc).
Oral contraceptives and synthetic hormones also cause vitamin B12 deficiency as well.

Consider the high value of:
--switching to long-acting metformin (until your sugars improve with low carb high fat Paleo + body fat recomposition)
--probiotics to repopulate the gut and intestines
--digestive enzymes (my patients really like SUPER ENZYMES by Now)

Good luck and I'd love to hear how you are doing later.

G

Anonymous said...

Are both graphs of someone who ate 75 g of glucose, but the first one also included a large amount of fat from cream? If so, what is the amount of fat that stabilized the insulin?

Dr. B G said...

Anonymous,

The OFTT was fat and little TINY amts of protein + carbs apparently (dose: see below -- based on body size, mass corresponds to our surface area; some drugs are dosed this way; our kidney function is optimally calculated this way as well). The OGTT was pure glucose only (75 g).

All the participants performed a 75 g OGTT and an OFTT. The interval
between OGTT and OFTT was 2 weeks. For both OGTT and OFTT, all the participants performed the program after a 12-h fast. Drinking alcohol beverages were inhibited from 3 days before OGTT to the end of OFTT. Nothing except water was allowed for the participants to intake during each OGTTor OFTT. For OFTT, all subjects ingested emulsified test material (OFTT cream, Jomo foods industry, Takasaki, Japan) containing 57% water, 33% lipid, 3% protein, and 7% carbohydrate (for diet composition; 77% lipid, 7% protein, and 16% carbohydrate) at a dose of 17 g fat/m2 of body surface area as previously reported [18–20].

Hope that helps clarify.

P said...

Thanks. I do use long-acting metformin. But I still need to divide up the dosage with lunch and dinner to reduce the side effects and bloating. I will try the probiotics and digestive enzymes. Thanks for the recommendation. I will update you after I have been taking them for a while.

Tim Terlegård said...

D.r. BG, I think I wasn't very clear. I was thinking about the insulin response after fat+carbs vs just carbs. What biological effects does the fat have that makes the same amount of carbs result in lower insulin when eaten with fat?

Is the fat slowing the emptying of the stomach? The difference in insulin levels is pretty high in the diagrams so it'd fascinating if it was just a slower emptying of the stomach that did this. Do we talk about hours?

Dr. T, Dr. B.G., and Billy E said...

Tim,

OK -- I've looked potato + butter v. potato alone -- butter doesn't blunt the glucose or insulin effects significantly. But...

Here another trial compared high carbs (150 g pasta + 2 French bread slices + 50 g tomato sauce + 125 g no-fat-yogurt = ~170-200g at ONE SITTING) with diverse fat loads of 40 grams:
--butter (saturated)
--olive oil (n-9 mono)
--safflower oil (n-6 pufa)

The insulin AUC for 7-hours after the meal was not statistically significant compared with a no fat test meal (e.g. high carb only ~170-200g).

What was interesting was the apo-B TG response. apo-B100 determines heart disease risk, cancer risk and inflammation.

Guess what was the lowest?

Butter. Even lower than the no-fat/high-carb meal. See Tables 2 and 3.

Butter lowered the most at 7h postprandially e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g --> TRL, CM and VLDL-TG. At 2-4hr postprandially, lowered the most the apoB100-TRL.

Small dense LDL was shown also by Ai M et al to follow a circadian rhythm. It has the highest concentration in the morning after fasting, in fact, 8-12 hours after a meal. A study examining sdLDL would probably show the same thing as these results, I conjecture.

There are downstream consequences to high carb meals -- spikes in insulin are so potent and work hours later to promote inflammation triggers.

Stephan justed posted on Butyrate, a 4-carbon saturated fatty acid.

Butter/ghee and short-chain SFA fermentation products are cool things. It can do some extent undo high carb, high gluten damage I believe.

-G



J Nutr. 2002 Dec;132(12):3642-9.

Butter differs from olive oil and sunflower oil in its effects on postprandial lipemia and triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins after single mixed meals in healthy young men.

Mekki N, et al.


Accumulation of postprandial triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins is generated by assimilation of ingested dietary fat and has been increasingly related to atherogenic risk. Nevertheless, the influence of different kinds of dietary fatty acids on postprandial lipid metabolism is not well established, except for (n-3) polyunsaturated long-chain fatty acids. Our goal was to evaluate the effects of test meals containing a common edible fat source of saturated (butter), monounsaturated (olive oil) or (n-6) polyunsaturated (sunflower oil) fatty acids on postprandial lipid and triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein responses. After a 12-h fast, 10 healthy young men ingested mixed meals containing 0 g (control) or 40 g fat, provided as butter, olive oil or sunflower oil in a random order. Fasting and postmeal blood samples were collected for 7 h. The no-fat test meal did not elicit any change over baseline except for plasma phospholipids, insulin and nonesterified fatty acids. Conversely, the three fat-containing meals elicited bell-shaped postprandial changes (P < 0.05) in serum triacylglycerols, free and esterified cholesterol, and nonesterified fatty acids. The butter meal induced a lower postprandial rise of triacylglycerols in serum and chylomicrons (incremental AUC, mmol.h/L: 0.72) than the two unsaturated oils (olive oil: 1.6, sunflower oil: 1.8), which did not differ. Circulating chylomicrons were smaller after the butter meal than after the two vegetable oil meals. The in vitro susceptibility of circulating chylomicrons to hydrolysis by postheparin plasma was higher after sunflower oil than after butter or olive oil. We conclude that butter results in lower postprandial lipemia and chylomicron accumulation in the circulation of young men than olive or sunflower oils after consumption of a single mixed meal.

David said...

Wasn't Stephan's post of butyrate interesting? Still not sure about the fiber thing, but whatever. I'm thinking about it.

When I had Lyme disease, my doctor put me on a neurotoxin elimination diet (basically based on this book: http://www.bodybio.com/storecategory126.aspx). It was grain free, low carb, high fat. It was terrific. But she had me take six capsules of butyrate every evening before bed. Looking back on it after seeing Stephan's post, I wonder if that's one of the things that led to the dramatic weight loss that I experienced. I didn't start out overweight, really, but at 5'8", I dropped down to 125 lbs on that diet. It came off without thinking twice about it, and I had to actually start consciously upping my calories and eating several pieces of fruit every day just to keep from shriveling away to nothingness. I really don't know what it was that made the diet so amazingly thermogenic, but it makes ya wonder if the extra butyrate might've helped.

David

Dr. B G said...

Hi David :)

I think butyrate is great and amazing, whether it is locally derived (for colon epithelium -- a point of interface between the outside world and us) or if consumed.

For a while before I ran out -- I was into eating 3-6 eggs scrambled in the microwave with chopped tomatoes and like 2 Tbs of Ghee (Purity Farms, clover-raised casein-free, lactose-free from Whole Foods and from the local health food store).

I was losing body fat too!

Normally if I eat almond butter or (WORSE!!) peanut butter and/or cheese (yes. CASEIN.) I'd wake up with a little DOUBLE-CHIN and seem fatter.

Thanks!!! Very interesting observations... Hhhhmmm.

-G

David said...

G,

Yeah, good stuff indeed. I remember back then I was eating almond butter by the bucket fulls (I bought the giant containers of fresh ground almond butter at Whole Foods) and it never made a bit of difference with stalling any weight loss. My doctor didn't let me eat any cheese except for goat cheese -- which I really love and did eat a lot of.

The 6 capsules of the butyrate I was taking each night had 3.6 grams of butyrate. According to the USDA database, you'd have to eat an entire stick of butter to get that much. That's a lot of butyrate.

David

caphuff said...

David,

intersesting anecdote about butyrate. I mean, were there any other noticeable effects, good or bad? Also, did you stop supplementing with butyrate and if so, why?

David said...

Hey caphuff,

It's hard to say what results were from the butyrate. I mentioned before that the butyrate was part of a broader neurotoxin elimination diet, which included many other supplements taken at strategic times (like chlorella, PhosChol, primrose oil, mastica, ox bile salts, etc). With all of these other factors, it's sometimes hard to distinguish which effects are from what.

When I was on this diet/protocol, I felt terrific. All benefits, and no drawbacks that I can remember. The only "bad" thing might be that I lost too much weight. I really did shrink down to a tiny size, and almost couldn't help it. My doc told me I was starting to look like a holocaust victim, and encouraged me to add in more fruit to my diet to stall the weight loss. It helped, but didn't stop it.

This whole protocol went on for a total of 6 months. I didn't go off the diet a single time in those six months. Not even the tiniest little cheat. Never missed a supplement dose. I stopped the butyrate because my doc said the detox was over and I could cease all those particular supplements. Only in retrospect have I seen that it might have played a significant role in my experience.

I was just visiting my parents for the holidays this last week, and found an old bottle of BodyBio butyrate in the freezer (the best place to keep it, 'cause it stinks!). Mom wasn't taking it, so I decided to experiment for a week. I took 6 per day, and just sort of ate whatever that week (I normally follow a strict low-carb diet or I put on weight easily and feel lousy). I didn't go WAY off the diet, but I definitely wasn't doing low carb. I ate fruit whenever I wanted, ate french fries once or twice-- little things here and there like that. So I was faithful with the butyrate, not changing any of my other supplements from normal. Well, by the end of the week, not only had I not gained any weight, I actually lost a little bit (and I don't even really need to lose anything). Also, while on the butyrate, I didn't have the usual nasty feeling (especially in my guts) I normally get from eating badly.

Interesting stuff. I might have to buy more of it and continue, just to see what happens.

David

caphuff said...

Thanks for the info David. Debating with myself whether to try supplementing. Based on Stephan's report butyrate looks mighty beneficial, although he doesn't advocate supplementing with it.

(btw, apologies for sidetracking thie thread . . .)

David said...

Stephan never really advocates supplementation of anything unless it's really just almost impossible to get adequate amounts from your diet. I know he sees value in supplementing vitamin D3 and CLO, and last I knew, he even took a little K2 every now and then. Also, the studies Stephan cites are studies that show benefit from supplemental butyrate.

Dr. Kurt Harris (paleonu.com) says that supplementing shouldn't be about taking some "magic" potion or pill, but about replacing something that's missing. I tend to agree, though I see other roles for supplements as well. With butyrate, I would suppose that I'm not making much with my diet (relatively low on fiber), and although I'm eating butter most days, I'm probably still not eating enough to get a great amount of butyrate. So I see supplementation as an easy way to compensate for my dietary shortcomings.

I don't think this thread is totally hijacked. G's post is about insulin, after all, and butyrate lowers insulin and increases insulin sensitivity. There you go.

David

Anonymous said...

David,
Very interesting about the butyrate. Do you think it helps digestive issues as far as bloating and gas? Which form were you taking (sodium, sodium and potassium or the calcium and magnesium)?

David said...

Anon,

Can't say from my experience whether it helps bloating and gas, as I don't really have those problems to begin with. Bad problems with gas might be from eating too many starches/carbs, and/or could be a malabsorption problem due to celiac, pancreatic insufficiency, lactose intolerance, etc.

I used the magnesium/calcium butyrate formula from bodybio.com

David

Anonymous said...

Thanks for your response, David. I was wondering what you meant by the "nasty feeling" you mentioned when you said "Also, while on the butyrate, I didn't have the usual nasty feeling (especially in my guts) I normally get from eating badly."

If I were to eat fruit and french fries, I would get gas and bloating. But on a very low fiber, very low carb diet my digestion is fine.

David said...

Ah, I see. I actually get pain in my intestines -- especially from grains. This is a different feeling than with gas and such. I'm not celiac, but I'm sure I am sensitive to gluten.

lightcan said...

Hi Dr. G,

I replied to your questions but it seems my post didn't go up. My weight is more or less stable for the last 4 months at 60 kgs for 1.68 cm.
I have some more questions. Seeing that the holidays are approaching and that the Christmas food is both high in sat fat and high glycemic carbs is there any advice you can give to a person with an LDL over 400? I suppose you'd say avoid refined sugar and roast potatoes and parsnips. If fats don't influence the absorption of sugar they shouldn't be used for that purpose, should they? I always make sure that if I eat anything remotely sugary I eat it after a low carb, high fat meal to prevent any spikes. Is it worth doing it? The glycation is still going to happen.
Do you think it's worth reducing my extra added saturated fat intake (butter on meat, double cream as dessert) to see my LDL go down as my doctor suggests? If I'm perimenopausal at 40 as you suggested what can be done? Hormone balancing?

Dr. B G said...

*hee* David is free to takeover anytime! Thank you per usual for sharing your big phat BRAIN :) I always learn an amazing TON of insights.

Dr. B G said...

lightcan,

I'm so sorry about your previous pst! I don't think I saw it (though replies go to the spam and have to be phished out).

You know, I don't know if it is because of our female genes and hormones, but I don't process fats nearly as efficiently as the Paleo guys out there. Dairy makes me fat -- but for winter I don't mind as much the extra layer (sort of). We don't respond to intermittent fasting similarly sometimes too (in the clinical trials).

It is the hormones.

So -- actually from T-muscle (formerly T-nation.com) I found that the female figure athletes go high carb, low low fat on some days. They cycle the carbs. I found that this works for me as well -- if I am eating higher carb, I don't do so much fat. I also do better with more veggies. Have you ever read the 'why French women don't get fat'? Leek soup for 2-3 days is the way they 'intermittently fast'. Certain veggies have higher diuretic potential. The fiber also is anti-inflammatory (if one does not have gut issues or severe diverticulosis/-litis).

Do you have any gut issues? Gas bloating heartburn? Probiotics and digestive enzymes actually play a role in LDL and LDL receptors (via LXR PPAR and bile acids).

Also it's the holidays. Perhaps humans are meant to glycate to some extent? Then work it off without worry later... I take insulin sensitizing supplements -- they just help me b/c I appear to need it still. I feel more focused, clear-minded and less insulin-y.

Yes regarding hormones. Hormones are the easiest way to sensitize insulin -- vitamin D, thyroid optimization, sex steroids.

Have you read Cheryl Harte MD, Uzzi Reiss MD or Hyman MD? Their books are great resources for me. They believe and advocate bio HRT and optimization.

Hope that helps!

-G

caphuff said...

David,

well, curiosity got the better of me. I just got my first shipment of butyrate. (Bodybio brand, mag-cal formula).

Took the first dose last night. Only effects to report yet, (other than a(maybe unrelated)slight increase in dream recall) was some upper right abdominal discomfort this morning. Curious about that, due to a gallstone history, with occasional flare-ups in my (pre-LC/ high-fat!) past.

Wondering if the extra butyrate may have kicked up some activity there, somehow.

Dr. B G said...

lightcan,

BTW Is wt loss a goal for you? If you are considering further weight loss, consider a strict Paleo plan (dairy-free). It further reduces inflammation for many people (works for me too, when I do it).

-G

Dr. B G said...

caphuff,

Have you ever considered the value of digestive enzymes? They contain lipases, amylases and other complex enzymes which aid in the proper breakdown and metabolism of food. It can be helpful when the gallbladder/pancreas/biliary tree is affected.

-G

caphuff said...

Thanks for the suggestion Dr. BG.

Well, I've been taking probiotics lately, and papaya enzymes have always been a tried and true friend of the old GI tract.

But gallstones oddly haven't really been an issue since cutting out sugar and wheat, going (more or less) low carb, and upping the fat intake(primarily through heavy cream, tee hee!)I say oddly because liberal fat intake would seem to go against the CW for gallbladder issues, no?

Anyway, this morning's episode could also have been kickback from eating at Burger King the other day (knew I shouldn't have done that, but it was all in the interest of science!) Maybe butyrate is a red herring. It was the whopper, in the car, with the fructose.

Dr. B G said...

WHOPPER...!? ;)

One of the 'contraindications' for a mod-high fat diet can be steatorrhea (fatty stools) and lack of gallbladder function. Bile acids (and lipases) are nice to have around to emulsify the fats for digestion.

caphuff said...

Except my 'stones were first diagnosed years ago after a lifetime on the Standard American Diet (if decades of sugary breakfast cereals and staggering amounts of sugar in my coffee is "standard").

If fat was the contraindicative guilty party then I'd have expected my GB to start complaining straight away when I cut down on the carbs sugar and replaced those calories with fat.

Instead, despite the onslaught of fat I've been pumping through the sluices for the past 5 or 6 months, the only twinge of GB distress came after an ill-considered fast-food meal that happened to coincide with butyrate supplementation. (Not to tar butyrate with the same feathers as a BK number 1 combo, or anything.)

Also, my poo doesn't float.

Dr. B G said...

caphuff,

*whooo* I'm so relieved your poo doesn't float :)

I used to be addicted whopper #3 w/fries and orange soda... extra mayo (n-6 pufas).

You ate the bun didnt you??!

I believe you are entirely correct -- it is mainly gluten and grains that trigger most GB issues. GB and stones are related autoimmune disorders. Someday I'll get a post out. Do you know what paid for college for me and my sisters? My dad is a surgeon and he did A LOT of choley's (and still does). *haa* He describes a healthy as velvety, nice, greenish, glassy looking like a jewelbag. The diseased ones are stonelike, hard. Calcified/fatty.

-G

Anonymous said...

What relationship is there between insulin spiking and elevated fasting inslin. A mouse study showed mice on a high-fat diet had elevated fasting insulin. I am always sceptical of these mouse studies, but it seems it does not follow necessarily that insulin spiking is the cause of elevated fasting insulin.

Regarding butyric acid, the fatty acid profiles I have seen for cheese, cream and whole milk yoghurt are also quite high in butyric acid. Indeed, I find that after having several samples of my artisan cheeses in the mmorning, I have abundant energy and have more power for a morning kayak, mountain bike or road bike outing.

Murray

David said...

caphuff,

I really doubt the butyrate had anything to do with the gallbladder discomfort. Butyrate is good for the gallbladder and shouldn't be a problem. The Burger King explanation seems much more likely. :) Keep me updated as to how you do with the butyrate. I'm really curious to see if others have similar experiences as mine.

I totally agree with G as to the digestive enzyme suggestion. If the gallbladder stuff continues, you might try taking some extra taurine and see if that helps. Also, look into d-limonene. I've seen gallbladder pain completely resolve after just a couple weeks of taking d-limonene. Look for the Jarrow brand, as it's good quality and yet super inexpensive.

David

caphuff said...

David: thanks for the tips.

d-limonene looks intriguing, though a quick google gave a lot of hits on injecting the stuff directly into the GB to achieve stone-dissolution. Wondering how effective a delivery method oral supplementation would be. Would enough of it find its way in there to start working its magic?

In any case, the butyrate experiment continues apace with no further complaints, as yet.

Dr. BG: yes, I ate the bun! That (and the fries and coke) was probably the main offender, there. Hope the old jewel bag was not too roughed up by it.

caphuff said...

also, not to keep harping on gallbladders, but Peter at Hyperlipid (back in 2008)blogged on the likely gluten connection. Very interesting.

http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2008/06/gluten-and-gall-bladders.html

David said...

I've also wondered about oral d-limonene, and haven't been able to find much info. I'm just going off my own observations with a couple different people. Coincidence or not, it seemed to work well (and quickly). In any case, I don't think it will hurt. Up to you, though.

Dr. B G said...

Hey!

I don't know what limone is but I just saw a patient earlier this wk who reported that gallbladder surgery was pending, she had terrible pain and discomfort. Her husband found a 'remedy' using juice of 1/2-1 lemon with 2 Tbs olive oil. She did that for 2-4wks then all her pain was gone and the surgeon ended up cancelling the surgery. She things she is gluten-intolerant as well (not celiac but on the spectrum).

Interesting huh? I don't if the fatty acids in olive oil help emulsify. Olive is 15% saturated fatty acids as well.

-G

David said...

G,

The olive oil/lemon juice gallbladder flush is interesting. About 4 years ago, when I had Lyme, I had some severe gallbladder attacks. REALLY painful stuff. I did the olive oil/lemon juice thing and passed over 100 "stones" overnight. The attacks never came back.

Now here's the weird thing. Awhile back, a case report came out in the Lancet that showed the "stones" from a similar flush to be basically nothing more than oleic acid and lemon juice -- i.e., not gallstones. However, there have been other case reports ('80s and early '90s; e.g. http://smj.sma.org.sg/2706/2706smj14.pdf) that showed this flush producing real gallstones. Who to believe?

So I have mixed feelings about it. On the one hand, it's confusing as to how well it actually works across the board. On the other hand, it seemed to work really well for me (and I later had a gallbladder sonogram that showed no gallstones). *shrugs* Maybe good, but I really don't know for sure.

David

caphuff said...

Something to consider for anyone thinking of supplementing butyrate: since commencing same the wife complains my breath stinks up the bedroom something fierce. Those butyrate pills do have a rather nasty odor to them. (Somewhere between kibble and vomitus!)

Maybe d-limonene would help in that department . . .

David said...

caphuff,

They smell awful, don't they?! Here's a tip that I learned early on: Keep the butyrate pills in the freezer. It really does help.

David

caphuff said...

I will try freezing. I hope it stops eau de butyrate from being exhaled in the breath.

caphuff said...

update re butyrate breath: a "confounding factor" was discovered last night -- my kid's school lunch box containing leftover bits of raw broccoli, which had been sitting (festering) behind the door since the holdiay break started. Hoo-doggies, what a reek!

The butyrate is innocent!

trinkwasser said...

"Indeed. I used to consume that much at breakfast (high carb, low fat Nutri-grain 'breakfast' bar and cup of industrial low fat bGH n-6 milk) -- then have horrible panic attacks, rushed heart rate, irregular skipped heart beats at night, mild anxiety, stress intolerance, flushing and occ headaches. "

BTDT. And then a couple of hours later I'd run out of energy even to the extent of falling down or passing out. Reactive hypoglycemia, which obviously didn't show up on an FBG, it took 50 years for a sensible GP to give me an OGTT.

Since then with my glucometer I discovered I have little to no Phase 1 insulin but plenty of Phase 2 and can spike to 140 - 180 after a Heart Healthy meal, then drop to 60 - 70, several times a day. But I'm still "not diabetic" because I only hit over 200 when no-one else is looking.

Paleo-type eating keeps my BG around 80 - 110 most of the time.

According to users the Metfartin effect results from eating carbs which aren't absorbed so pass through.

Gallstones? BTDT also. They're related to high cholesterol (from all those healthy carbs) and also to neuropathy from high BG preventing the gallbladder from contracting properly.

When I had them fat would cause an attack a few hours later as stones passed throguh the bile duct while I writhed in agony on the floor praying to die for several hours.

After cholecystectomy I've had no problem eating fat, except for blocking the bog occasionally, my current turds sink instead of floating. Meat, fish, cheese and vegetables obviously contain enough fibre without the hassle of bran.

Also I no longer blow off like a carthorse.